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The Key for a Healthy Life Cats at 10 years of age are categorised as senior and at 15 are considered “geriatric”. Like humans, cats do develop issues associated with aging. This is not a problem, but the risk of age-related diseases includes diabetes, thyroid disorder, obesity, arthritis, etc… can increase with an inappropriate diet….
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Dental health isn’t just essential to humans; it is also vital to animals too. As many as 85% of cats over three years of age may suffer from some form of gum disease or infected tooth. Gum disease or an infected tooth can affect the overall health of the animal. Because animals do not brush…
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Cats have keen vision; they can see much more detail than dogs. Concentrated in the centre of the retina of the eye, a specific type of cell called a cone gives cats excellent visual acuity and binocular vision. This allows them to judge speed and distance very well, an ability that helped them survive as…
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Dietary issues are frequently ignored or not properly addressed. However, nutritional support can play an integral role in the successful management of many feline conditions, including Feline diabetes. Nutrition can be integrated into the management of diabetes. The goal is to use the cat’s diet as a means to support its overall body health and…
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In 2005, scientists discovered that all cats lack one of a pair of proteins required to sense sweetness. The missing protein was the result of a deletion, the loss of part of a chromosome or sequence of DNA, in a gene. The deletion in the gene prevented one of the proteins, that enables the perception…
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Studies have shown that food allergies account for the third most common type of feline allergy. Although itchy, irritating skin problems are the most common signs of this allergy, an estimated 10 percent to 15 percent of affected cats also exhibit gastrointestinal signs, such as vomiting and diarrhea. The itching that typically signals the presence…
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Cats are obligate carnivores. This means that cats must eat raw meat and bone. Cats in the wild do not find cooked or dry food scattered on the ground. To feed they must hunt their prey, which would consist of mice, birds, rabbits, insects, lizards etc… They will often eat their prey whole, including the…
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